It is a fact of life that more people are having trouble affording their own homes, as well as affording their own places to live—in general. This has resulted in multi-generational homes where at least two or more generations, or a generation of grandparents and a generation of children under 25, live. A record 64 million—24%–of Americans live in multigenerational homes. The amount of Americans living in multigenerational homes decreased from 1950 to 1980. However, from 1980 to 2000, the numbers rose. A sharp increase in multigenerational living arrangements occurred between 2000 and 2016, with the numbers going from 42.4 (15%) million to 60 million (20%). On a chart, this sharp increase in the number of people living in multigenerational homes roughly mirrors the sharp decrease that happened from 1950 to 1980.

Reasons for the Increase in Multigenerational Housing

There are many reasons why more people are living in multigenerational housing situations. First off, a lot of younger people cannot afford homes. Home prices have increased over the years, with homes in larger metropolitan areas becoming unattainable. Such a situation has resulted in many people looking for many homes for sale cedar rapids ia and elsewhere. Many younger people are unable to attain solid, stable jobs. Too many employers do not want to commit to keeping employees. Another problem is salary. Too many jobs pay too little. In many situations, employers keep their employees on their toes by giving them erratic hours and random tasks. Employers find any reason to fire their employees, and employers do not have loyalty. Companies do not want to give their workers benefits, and they try to get around it as much as possible.

Also, there happens to be a lot of competition in the job market. To make matters worse, ethnic and racial discrimination is rampant. If you want to get a job in a specific industry where people of a specific background are only hired, you will be out of luck. This is a taboo subject, but it is a known fact that many lower level jobs are taken up specifically by immigrants from South and Central America. For some reason, many employers who hire people of such backgrounds seem to want to only hire them and nobody else.

Another thing to think about is the population of foreigners and non-whites in the United States. Foreigners and non-whites tend to have larger families and live in multigenerational homes for economic and cultural reasons. Perhaps the influx of people from various countries and the change in racial demographics are adding to the number of Americans living in multigenerational homes.

The Problems of Multigenerational Housing

The one, big problem with multigenerational housing is the fact that a bunch of people have to share space with each other. This can be very problematic because of the fact that people tend to get into arguments with each other more often, and familiarity tends to breed contempt, when you live in small spaces with numerous other people.